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    1. #1
      Haggis de Montreal

      Tubingen, Germany

      Does anyone have first hand experience of what Tubingen, near Stuttgart in southern Germany, is like as a place to live and work? During a brief visit a few years ago, it seemed quite pleasant in a medieval Oxbridge sort of way, but now we may be faced with the prospect of moving there as my wife has a good shot at a senior academic position at the university.

      One concern if that neither of us speaks the language at the moment. I am also wondering what it would be like trying to find work for myself and establish a social life there.

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    3. #2
      Andy Chapman
      Sorry Haggis, can't answer you questions and i'm not sure if there is anyone that can
      i hope i'm wrong and you get an answer soon.

      And a big welcome to Brits-Abroad


      .

    4. #3
      traveller
      Quote Originally Posted by Haggis de Montreal View Post
      Does anyone have first hand experience of what Tubingen, near Stuttgart in southern Germany, is like as a place to live and work? During a brief visit a few years ago, it seemed quite pleasant in a medieval Oxbridge sort of way, but now we may be faced with the prospect of moving there as my wife has a good shot at a senior academic position at the university.

      One concern if that neither of us speaks the language at the moment. I am also wondering what it would be like trying to find work for myself and establish a social life there.
      I don't know anything about Tubingen, but I'm guessing looking for work without speaking the language is going to put you at a real disadvantage and will limit you on your social circle. As far as working - if you're from the EU you should be eligible to work. I found one site from a quick search on Google -

      http://www.howtogermany.com/pages/residence2.html

      Good luck with your decision!!

    5. #4
      Doz
      German is a fairly easy language to learn, why not start with a basic course now and that will certainly help on the job and social front.
      Good luck

    6. #5
      Tim
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      Quote Originally Posted by Doz View Post
      German is a fairly easy language to learn, why not start with a basic course now and that will certainly help on the job and social front.
      Good luck
      Errrrr no! Just from my own experience, that is I'm crap at language anyway and have trouble speaking the queens language anyway.

    7. #6
      traveller
      Quote Originally Posted by Tim View Post
      Errrrr no! Just from my own experience, that is I'm crap at language anyway and have trouble speaking the queens language anyway.
      Oh Tim you philistine!! German is one of the easiest languages to learn - it's so logical. You might find you're better at it than English! :twitcy:

    8. #7
      Liz H
      Quote Originally Posted by Doz View Post
      German is a fairly easy language to learn, why not start with a basic course now and that will certainly help on the job and social front.
      Good luck
      I'm with Tim on this one. Having studied German for several yrs. There are too many variables for anyone wanting to take a crash course e.g. 3 genders -- masculine, feminine and neuter for nouns each with different case endings , nominative for the subject of the sentence , accusative for the object of the sentence, dative for the indirect object in the sentence and the genitive showing possession, then there is the plural of all of these. 3 words for the English word 'the' i.e. der, die, das and the plural die, again with variations depending on the case of the noun. Then there are the verbs -----.
      No doubt if you had lots of time to take classes and made a concerted effort you would have some basic knowledge, but the workplace would no doubt require specialized vocabulary.
      Had a friend who was fluent in the language, but had a difficult time obtaining a position because it was not good enough.
      You will probably find that the Germans, on the whole, will speak better English than you will speak German. There is a little 'snobbishness' in Europe too because many people are multilingual, whereas North Americans and Brits tend to be unilingual.
      I am by no means saying it can not be done, but not in the short term.
      Last edited by Liz H; 05-02-2009 at 01:53 AM.

    9. #8
      Liz H
      Quote Originally Posted by traveller View Post
      Oh Tim you philistine!! German is one of the easiest languages to learn - it's so logical. You might find you're better at it than English! :twitcy:
      If you know Latin , it would help with understanding the case endings., I suppose you could fudge those in speech , but in writing that would be different. I tend to be a purist though due to my previous occupation.
      Last edited by Liz H; 05-02-2009 at 12:31 AM. Reason: addition

    10. #9
      Doz
      Im with Trav on this one, i thought German was easy to learn at school, i can still remember a lot now and it has come in useful on occasions

    11. #10
      Tim
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      Quote Originally Posted by Liz H View Post
      I'm with Tim on this one. Having studied German for several yrs. There are too many variables for anyone wanting to take a crash course e.g. 3 genders -- masculine, feminine and neuter for nouns each with different case endings , nominative for the subject of the sentence , accusative for the object of the sentence, dative for the indirect object in the sentence and the genitive showing possession, then there is the plural of all of these. 3 words for the English word 'the' i.e. der, die, das and the plural die, again with variations depending on the case of the noun. Then there are the verbs -----.
      No doubt if you had lots of time to take classes and made a concerted effort you would have some basic knowledge, but the workplace would no doubt require specialized vocabulary.
      Had a friend who was fluent in the language, but had a difficult time obtaining a position because it was not good enough.
      You will probably find that the Germans, on the whole, will speak better English than you will speak German. There is a little 'snobbishness' in Europe too because many people are multilingual, whereas North Americans and Brits tend to be unilingual.
      I am by no means saying it can not be done, but not in the short term.

      You lost me after the first line. :goofy: As you say most folk are multilingual in Europe and speak at least two languages. It does put the UK miles behind when it comes to having to learn another language. I do still remember at school being able to to a language for a few years and then drop it. Personally I reckon kids should have a second language skill till they leave.

      T

     

     
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