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    Thread: American Visa Lottery


    1. #1

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      American Visa Lottery

      I was asked a question today and I really don't know the answer. Some friends of ours have now been granted Australian Citizenship, but they are wanting to move to America to be with their family. I know as a British citizen they couldn't apply for the lottery, but now they are Australian Citizens would they be allowed to apply?

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    3. #2

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      Quote Originally Posted by Ktee View Post
      I was asked a question today and I really don't know the answer. Some friends of ours have now been granted Australian Citizenship, but they are wanting to move to America to be with their family. I know as a British citizen they couldn't apply for the lottery, but now they are Australian Citizens would they be allowed to apply?
      No Ktee, they wouldn't be eligible to apply for the DVL. In simple terms - your country of birth is what determines your eligibility.

      If you have a parent that was born in an eligible countryfor the DV lottery, and they were living in that country at the time of your birth, then you may have the chance to be "charged" to that country. meaning that you may be considered under that countries yearly allowance of DVL applicants.

      Here is the wording re the eligibility and of possible "chargeability" taken directly from the state travel instructions re DV Lottery-

      "Your country of eligibility will normally be the same as your country of birth. Your country of eligibility is not related to where you live. ―"Native" ordinarily means someone born in a particular country, regardless of the individual・s current country of residence or nationality.
      For immigration purposes, "native" can also mean someone who is entitled to be ―"charged" to a country other than the one in which he/she was born under the provisions of Section 202(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. For example, if you were born in a country that is not eligible for this year・s DV program, you may claim chargeability to the country where your derivative spouse was born, but you will not be issued a DV-1 unless your spouse is also eligible for and issued a DV-2, and both of you must enter the United States together with the DVs. In a similar manner, a minor dependent child can be ―charged‖to a parent・s country of birth.

      Finally, if you were born in a country not eligible to participate in this year’s DV program, you can be ―charged‖ to the country of birth of either of your parents as long as neither parent was a resident of the ineligible country at the time of the your birth. In general, people are not considered residents of a country in which they were not born or legally naturalized if they are only visiting the country, studying in the country temporarily, or stationed temporarily in the country for business or professional reasons on behalf of a company or government from a country other than the country in which the applicant was born."
      Last edited by purple; 15-03-2011 at 09:00 PM.
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    4. #3

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      Information and list of qualifying Countries of birth here:
      Keep scrolling down the pages -

      http://travel.state.gov/pdf/1318-DV2...tions-ENGL.pdf

      People born in Northern Ireland qualify, as well as those born in the Republic of Ireland.
      A friend of mine in Ireland won a Diversity Visa.
      It enables her to spend the winter months with her son who lives in Florida,
      and to work while she is here.

      Beware of scams....you can only apply through the State Dept and there is no fee.
      Don't believe anyone who says he can get you a DV, or any other type of Visa.

      I know a Brit who is in Federal Prison here because he promised his compatriates
      he could get them a Business Visa.
      Last edited by Florida Redhead; 17-03-2011 at 08:38 AM.
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    5. #4

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      Thank you both of you for your comments, America seems quite strict which is not always a bad thing.

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      What many would-be applicants fail to realize is...YOU are the one who has to apply for any kind of visa, Nobody can obtain a Visa for you.
      You can get advice from an Immigration Attorney, but you can probably get the same advice by going straight to USCIS.
      It's you who has to sign the paperwork and stand in front of the Immigration Officer.
      You can learn a lot from the website, and if you're honest with them, they are not bad guys.
      http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis
      Last edited by Florida Redhead; 18-03-2011 at 08:11 PM.
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