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    Thread: The English Language (and its complexities)


    1. #1

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      The English Language (and its complexities)

      Lovers of the English language will enjoy this. It is an example of why people learning English have so much trouble. Learning the nuances of English makes it a difficult language.
      This two-letter word in English has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that word is 'UP'. It is listed in the dictionary as an [adv], [prep], [adj], [n] or [v].
      It's easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP?
      At a meeting, why does a topic come UP? Why do we speak UP, and why are the officers UP for election. Why is it UP to the secretary to write UP a report? We call UP our friends, brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver, warm UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen. We lock UP the house and fix UP the old car. At other times this little word has real special meaning. People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UP excuses...
      To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed UP is special!
      And this UP is confusing: A drain must be opened UP because it is blocked UP. We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night. We seem to be pretty mixed UP about the word UP!
      To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look UP the word UP in the dictionary. In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4 of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions. If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used. It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don't give UP, you may wind UP with a hundred or more.
      When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP. When the sun comes out we say it is clearing UP. When it rains, the earth soaks it UP. When it does not rain for a while, things dry UP. One could go on and on, but I'll wrap this UP for now because my time is UP!
      Oh... one more thing: What is the first thing you do in the morning and the last thing you do at night? U-P!
      Don't mess UP. Send this on to everyone you look UP in your address book... It's UP to you! Now I think I'll shut UP.


      Not my work BTW but cant copy link as the site it came from might be a BIT RUDE FOR HERE

    2. Moneycorp - Commercial foreign exchange since 1979
    3. #2

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      It is true, I do think English is a very hard language to learn. What gets me is that my boys are always being corrected on their spelling because Australians spell the American way.
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    4. #3
      purple
      You mean the aussies spell words as they sound, like tire, and color?
      Makes sense of course, because the yanks speak funny too. ;)
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    5. #4

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      Quote Originally Posted by purple View Post
      You mean the aussies spell words as they sound, like tire, and color?
      Makes sense of course, because the yanks speak funny too. ;)
      Not really what i was getting at but if that the case then why don't the aussies spell colour as culler? and mate as mayte?
      I'll tell yer why, its because they would rather copy the seppos that be seen to follow the English.
      Some fink to do wiv the big ol' chip on their shoulder.
      Last edited by Aldo; 07-03-2011 at 05:57 AM.

    6. #5
      Trueblue
      Quote Originally Posted by Aldo View Post
      Not really what i was getting at but if that the case then why don't the aussies spell colour as culler? and mate as mayte?
      I'll tell yer why, its because they would rather copy the seppos that be seen to follow the English.
      Some fink to do wiv the big ol' chip on their shoulder.
      Mate you have one serious problem, it appears you take great pride in knocking people constantly, boy are you one nasty bit of work!

    7. #6

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      Sorry blue, i have just added a smiley to depict i was only having a laugh. The poms and aussies are always enguaging in a bit of banter - it tradition mate.
      Have a bundy n coke on me cobber