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    Thread: Moving Back to the UK - Check List


    1. #1

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      Post Moving Back to the UK - Check List

      Tax, benefits, pensions and National Insurance


      • tell HM Revenue & Customs when you will be coming back, and find about your tax liability on returning to the UK
      • check with the country you are living in about any tax you may owe before you leave
      • for National Insurance contributions, contact the HM Revenue & Customs National Insurance Contributions Office (International Services)
      • get in touch with the Department for Work and Pensions regarding your pension and benefits, giving them details of your return move and your contact details abroad and in the UK




      Health


      • register with a GP and a dentist in the UK
      • notify any private medical insurance and travel insurance companies with which you have policies
      • inform your GP, dentist and other health practitioners in the country you are leaving, and see if your records can be sent to your new health professionals in the UK




      Your children


      • notify the school authorities that you are leaving the country
      • before returning to the UK, contact the relevant local education authority regarding school places




      Your home


      • arrange to sell your property or end its lease as appropriate, and sort out removals
      • contact the local council in the area you want to move to - its council tax department and the electoral registration unit will need to know when you will be returning to the UK and your UK address
      • notify your utility companies abroad that you are moving and give them a forwarding address, so they can send you final bills and information on any outstanding payments or refunds; you will also need to set up accounts for utility services once you have found a property in the UK
      • tell your bank, building society or any financial institution with whom you have a policy or agreement that you are moving
      • have your mail forwarded
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    2. Moneycorp - Commercial foreign exchange since 1979
    3. #2

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      Moving Back to UK School

      Parents who have moved from overseas to reside in England with their children may express a preference for their children to attend a maintained school or academy under the normal admission arrangements described in this Code regardless of their immigration status. This includes the children of asylum seekers; parents who have limited leave to enter or remain in the UK; and teachers coming to the UK with their children on a teacher exchange scheme.
      British citizens and lone children with right of abode

      There are no restrictions on entry to the UK for children (whether accompanied or unaccompanied by their parents) who hold full British citizen passports (but not British overseas territories or British Overseas passports) or children from countries whose passports have been endorsed to show that they have the right of abode in this country. Such children will be permitted to enter this country irrespective of their purpose in doing so and are entitled to apply for a place at a maintained school or academy.
      EEA nationals

      The European Economic Area (EEA) was established on 1 January 1994 following an agreement between the member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and the European Community.
      Under European Community law, and where the provisions of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 are satisfied, nationals of the European Economic Area (which comprises the all member states of the European Union together with Switzerland, Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein) and their children of any age, who come to the UK lawfully to work or for certain other economic purposes have a right to reside in the UK. They enjoy the same rights to education as British citizens. This applies equally to lone EEA national children who come to the UK as students, who are unaccompanied by their parents. Non-EEA children of EEA parents who are unaccompanied by their parents do not have this right.
      Non-EEA nationals

      Non-EEA children who apply on their own for leave to enter or remain in the UK to study will only be granted leave to enter or remain if they satisfy the following requirements of the Immigration Rules.1

      • For children coming to study for six months or less, (paragraph 46A -child visitor). A child must attend a school or private education institution that meets the requirements of paragraph 46A (vii). It must be outside the maintained sector, unless the child is coming for a short exchange or educational visit. In the latter instance the requirements of paragraph 46A (viii) must be met.
      • For children coming to study for more than six months, (paragraph 245ZZ child student). If the child is less than 16 years old, he or she must produce proof of acceptance for a course of study at an independent fee-paying school outside the maintained sector or a bona fide private educational institution.

      If a child is found to be attending a maintained school other than for a short exchange or educational visit, they will infringe the conditions of their leave to enter and action could be taken against them by the United Kingdom Border Agency.



      Contact your Local Authority for where you will be living for a list of schools http://local.direct.gov.uk/LDGRedirect/Start.do?mode=1

    4. #3

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      HM Revenue and Customs - UK Tax Man

      If you are returning to live or work in the UK after a period abroad, you will need to tell HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) and sort out your tax affairs both in the UK and the country you are leaving. Changes to your residence status may affect the tax you pay.
      If you return to the UK to work after a period of absence, you'll have to fill in certain forms to start paying tax again. Which forms you need to complete will depend on the type of work you are doing. If you're not working you don't need to complete a specific form, but you do still need to contact HMRC.
      If you are going to work for an employer in the UK, they will give you the forms you need to complete so that they can deduct tax from your earnings under Pay As You Earn (PAYE). In this circumstance, you don't need to contact HMRC.
      If you are going to work for yourself you will need to register as self-employed with HMRC so that the right tax and National Insurance records are set up for you.
      If you have returned to the UK to live but do not intend to work here, you should tell HMRC if you have any UK or foreign income and/or capital gains. You may need to start paying UK tax on these. HMRC will advise you of any action you need to take.

      Your tax status when you return

      If you return to the UK to live or work, you will normally become resident in the UK. This means you:

      • pay tax on your UK income and capital gains
      • are entitled to the Income Tax Personal Allowance (unless you pay tax on the 'remittance basis') and the Capital Gains Tax Annual Exempt Amount
      • will have to pay UK tax on your foreign income and gains (unless you pay tax on the 'remittance basis')

      The remittance basis might apply if you are not UK domiciled or not ordinarily resident in the UK. Find out more by following the first link below.
      Paying tax on the remittance basis - an introduction
      Personal Allowance
      Introduction to Capital Gains Tax
      Returning to the UK within five years of leaving - 'temporary non-residents'

      If you were a UK resident and moved abroad for less than five full tax years before becoming resident in the UK again, you will have been 'temporarily non-resident' for the period you were away. For more information about temporary non-residents and paying tax on the remittance basis follow the link below.
      Paying tax on the remittance basis - an introduction
      Returning to the UK less than a full tax year since your departure

      If you were out of the country for less than a full tax year (6 April to 5 April) you will have remained UK resident while you were abroad. This means you will have to pay tax on your UK income and gains, and you may also have to pay UK tax on your foreign income and gains for the whole tax year. Follow the link below to find out how residence affects your tax.
      Meaning of residence and how it affects your tax
      You may be entitled to tax relief under a double taxation agreement.
      Double taxation agreements
      If you become UK resident part way through a tax year

      If you become UK resident part way through a tax year, you may be eligible for special tax treatment for the portion of the tax year in which you were not resident.
      You will be taxed as a resident in the UK from the date you arrived and taxed as not resident before this date if both of the following apply:

      • you have come to the UK to take up permanent residence or to stay for at least two years
      • you were not ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom before you arrived

      You may also qualify where you went abroad for full-time employment. If this is the case HMRC recommends that you read section 8.6 of the booklet HMRC6 'Residence, Domicile and the Remittance basis'.

    5. #4

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      National Health Service

      If you are returning to the UK as a former resident or a new migrant.

      Under the current Regulations, anyone who is taking up or resuming permanent residence in the UK is entitled to free National Health Service (NHS) hospital treatment in England. If your intention is to live permanently in the UK you will be exempt from hospital charges from the date of your arrival in the country but you should expect to be asked to prove your intention and that you are legally entitled to live here. This exemption applies to your spouse, civil partner and children (under the age of 16, or 19 if in further education) if they are living here with you on a permanent basis.
      If you do not have an automatic right to take up permanent residence but have applied to the Home Office for leave to enter/remain on a settled basis, you will be chargeable for any hospital treatment up to the point your application is granted or until you accrue 12 months lawful residence in the UK.
      Once you are living here permanently you will become ordinarily resident and the Regulations will cease to apply to you. Your spouse, civil partner and child will also be considered ordinarily resident if they are living permanently in the UK with you and have the right to do so. If they are not living permanently in the UK then the Regulations will apply and in order to be entitled to free hospital treatment they will have to meet one of the categories of exemption in their own right.
      In common with those ordinarily resident in the UK, anyone who meets the criteria of ordinary residence or is exempt from charges for hospital treatment will have to pay statutory NHS charges, eg prescription charges, unless they also qualify for exemption from these, and will have to go onto waiting lists for treatment where appropriate.
      The Regulations place a responsibility on individual hospitals to determine whether, in accordance with the Regulations, a patient is liable to be charged for treatment or not. In order to establish entitlement, hospitals can ask you to provide documentation that supports your claim that you intend to live permanently in the UK. It is for you to decide what to supply, however examples of evidence could include:

      • documentation to prove you are entitled to live in the UK such as British Passport, permission from the Home Office;
      • documentation that proves your intention is to reside here permanently such as sale of goods/property overseas, receipts showing shipping of goods, looking for work, application for benefits, children are attending school.

      GPs have a measure of discretion in accepting applications to join their patient lists. It is advisable to approach a GP practice and apply to register on its list of NHS patients. The practice may choose to accept or decline your application. An application may be refused if the practice has reasonable grounds for doing so. A practice would not be able to refuse your application on the grounds of race, gender, social class, age, religion, sexual orientation, appearance, disability or medical condition. If you have difficulty in registering with a GP, you should get in touch with your local primary care trust (PCT).
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    6. #5
      AngloDansk
      Sorry if posting on wrong thread. i just wanted to know if anyone the HM customs and revenue email address as its not listed on their site. i need to report to them that i am moving back to the Uk from Denmark and Don't know how to go about it. any help would be greatly appreciated
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    7. #6

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      You can contact them using this online form.
      https://online.hmrc.gov.uk/shortform...ww.hmrc.gov.uk

      More info and contact details here
      http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/cnr/email.htm
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      it happens a lot everywhere in the world...